Obituaries

Anna Hohenacker
B: 1923-12-24
D: 2016-06-26
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Hohenacker, Anna
Evelyn Janzen
B: 1941-07-04
D: 2016-06-26
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Janzen, Evelyn
Boyd Mattheis
B: 1926-12-23
D: 2016-06-17
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Mattheis, Boyd
Edna Piehl
B: 1935-08-20
D: 2016-06-15
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Piehl, Edna
Crystal Simons
B: 1981-04-11
D: 2016-06-13
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Simons, Crystal
Yevonne Dent
B: 1931-05-10
D: 2016-06-11
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Dent, Yevonne
Janice Altin
B: 1957-10-08
D: 2016-06-11
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Altin, Janice
Lorne Forsythe
B: 1936-02-20
D: 2016-06-09
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Forsythe, Lorne
Agnes Coderre
B: 1930-01-30
D: 2016-06-07
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Coderre, Agnes
Donald Hansen
B: 1929-10-19
D: 2016-06-04
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Hansen, Donald
Bernice Halak
B: 1938-10-17
D: 2016-06-04
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Halak, Bernice
Lucille Goodman
B: 1939-04-30
D: 2016-06-04
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Goodman, Lucille
Philip Stach
B: 1937-10-10
D: 2016-06-04
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Stach, Philip
Roberta Hochheimer
B: 1970-08-25
D: 2016-06-01
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Hochheimer, Roberta
Darin Pudwell
B: 1963-07-20
D: 2016-06-01
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Pudwell, Darin
Jack Hildenbrand
B: 1929-03-24
D: 2016-05-31
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Hildenbrand, Jack
Nora Roberts
B: 1932-03-07
D: 2016-05-27
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Roberts, Nora
Jean Bull
B: 1927-12-09
D: 2016-05-25
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Bull, Jean
Emma Radke
B: 1928-08-31
D: 2016-05-24
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Radke, Emma
Cecile Hassett
B: 1927-08-13
D: 2016-05-23
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Hassett, Cecile
Eleanor Scott
B: 1941-04-08
D: 2016-05-17
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Scott, Eleanor

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1 Dunmore Road SE
Medicine Hat, AB T1A 1Z5
Phone: 403-528-2599 or 1-800-317-2647
Fax: 403-526-9732
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Welcome

LOCAL PEOPLE PROVIDING A FINER TRADITION OF CARING

Saamis Memorial Funeral Chapel and Crematorium is conveniently located in the heart of Medicine Hat.  The seven acre, park-like setting, affords more than adequate parking.  The large comfortable chapel is on the main floor level and is wheelchair accessible.  The mural, entitled “The Adventure of Life”, at the front of the Chapel was designed and erected by local artist, Jim Marshall.  Each raw brick was painstakingly sculptured, numbered, fired and then mortared together on the chapel site. The mural depicts the four stages of life—baby, child, young adult and old age.  The main building is a turn-of-the-century home built by William James Shannon in 1906.  It provides warm, home-like surroundings for family and friends.

We would like to thank the community for all the support shown us over the past several years—it is very much appreciated!  Besides providing reasonably priced and personal funeral service, our goal has been to serve the community—whether through service club volunteering, providing support to local teams, clubs and events, or providing information seminars.  Having been born and raised in this area, we know how important community is; therefore, it is with pleasure that we are able to introduce our staff who are here to serve you in a dignified and professional manner and the many services Saamis Memorial Funeral Chapel and Crematorium can provide. 

From our early beginnings we have grown to include, not only a funeral chapel, but also a cemetery, crematorium, on-site monument shop, and counselling services.  This website will also outline these extra conveniences and services.  It also serves as an information guide about a topic that will affect all of us at one time or another.  Please feel free to call us directly for further discussion and information.

News & Events
2016-04-13
Medalta…. Last evening I attended, what you might call a Fund Raising Request for the Medalta Historical Site. I haven’t been through the entire site for a very long time and I was totally impressed with what has been accomplished. It is indeed becoming a world renowned historical site. They have resident artists there from all over Canada and as far away as China. This definitely says a lot in my opinion! Besides “potters” honing their skills, Medalta has become an integral part of Medicine Hat. It offers classes for both adults and children, but it does more than that--it allows children to have hand on experiences with history. A number of receptions are held in the facility, including weddings, anniversaries, birthdays, etc. It is basically a living, working museum, but also has an art gallery for artists to display their works and a farmers’ market. Perhaps my tour last night “hit home” for me. Over the last quarter century my business partner, Cam Davis, and I have promoted Saamis Memorial as more than just a funeral home. We have striven to make it an integral part of the community. Over the years we have had hundreds of pictures taken on the property of graduations, birthdays, weddings, etc. We have also hosted bridal showers, small wedding receptions, club meetings, birthday parties, family dinners, etc. However, in the case of Medalta’s huge endeavor, all of this does not happen without adequate funding—not all of this can be accomplished through government and municipal grants. Many families whom we have the honor of serving at Saamis Memorial Funeral Chapel, Crematorium and Reception Centre list a charity that friends and family can donate to in memory of a loved one. If in doubt of which charity to be named, I would like to suggest the Medalta Historical Site be considered as a viable alternative. It is giving so much to the community and the donations remain here. Thank you Medalta for a very enjoyable evening it was an honor to be included.
2016-03-14
I was thinking today how times have changed. For part of my youth I grew up in rural Saskatchewan, Hatton, near Walsh Alberta. We did not have electricity until I was seven years old. The house was lit by coal-oil (kerosene lamps ) and hi-test mantle lamps. Now, for me I really didn&#039;t know much else. It was great to come to Medicine Hat and see my grandparents--my mother&#039;s parents had push button &quot;thing ma jigs&quot; on the wall and when you pressed the white button the lights on the ceiling went on and when you hit the black button they went off--it was magic! My dad&#039;s parents had switches on the wall and when you flipped it up the lights went on and when you pushed it down they went out, Now for a young lad that was intriguing and you can guess it--I couldn&#039;t leave them alone until I received a strong reprimand lol. For a short period of time we lived in Medicine Hat so I could start school there, but returned to Hatton the following year. We never had running water so the water pail and dipper on the cupboards were standard fixtures and the outside biffy had its own peculiar order. Needless to say indoor plumbing was also a very intriguing thing for a young boy. In fact it remained intriguing until I graduated from high school and my parents returned to Medicine Hat. But what really &quot;got&quot; me thinking about this was I can&#039;t imagine the shock to my mother&#039;s system when she married my father. She was a &quot;city girl&quot; and rural Alberta and Saskatchewan were far from &quot;city friendly&quot; lol!!! She had to learn how to stoke wood/coal stoves, and later shake down the ashes as well as learning how to cook on them!! She had to learn how to trim lamp wicks, replace mantles and fill the lamps with fuel. She had to endure the &quot;sweet aroma&quot; of the outdoor biffy and learn to use a chamber pot in the winter. She had to haul water by pail for drinking, washing dishes and clothes, bathing and cleaning. Needless to say water was used sparingly as there was one well that served the needs of the entire &quot;hamlet&quot;. Rain water was collected in a cistern and had to be pulled up by pail--it was often used for bathing and washing clothes. That was quite a knack to flip the pail just right so it would fill with water. In the winter, she collected and melted snow for washing clothes and cleaning. I am sure she faced the same anxiety and hardships as the many war-brides faced when they came to Western Canada--all because of love lol. However, like the war-brides, she survived. In fact, in 1969, when my father insisted they return to Medicine Hat, she really didn&#039;t want to leave, but once back to civilization she adapted very quickly lol. (By the way we never did have indoor plumbing, electricity came in 1958 or 1959 and the telephone was on a &quot;party line&quot; and eventually was abandoned.) Can you imagine anyone of us surviving that in this day and age???? But, it was a simpler time, where community counted. We had community dances, bingo, card parties and just good old fashioned visiting!!! What a novel idea of actually talking to someone face to face--not &quot;FaceBooking&quot; or texting lol!!! I apologize for reminiscing, but ironically as I grow older I find myself reflecting on the past--sometimes with fond memories others with regret that I did not handle situations better--but that is life!!! I remember my grandparents doing this and as a child, I loved hearing their stories. Unfortunately, with technology and the internet I am afraid much of this sharing of family history will be lost. With Easter soon upon us, many families will be gathering together so I encourage you to &quot;shelve&quot; the i-phone and share some stories. Everyone may be surprised how much fun that can be.
2016-03-14
How times have changed....... I was thinking today how times have changed. For part of my youth I grew up in rural Saskatchewan, Hatton, near Walsh Alberta. We did not have electricity until I was seven years old. The house was lit by coal-oil (kerosene lamps ) and hi-test mantle lamps. Now, for me I really didn&#039;t know much else. It was great to come to Medicine Hat and see my grandparents--my mother&#039;s parents had push button &quot;thing ma jigs&quot; on the wall and when you pressed the white button the lights on the ceiling went on and when you hit the black button they went off--it was magic! My dad&#039;s parents had switches on the wall and when you flipped it up the lights went on and when you pushed it down they went out, Now for a young lad that was intriguing and you can guess it--I couldn&#039;t leave them alone until I received a strong reprimand lol. For a short period of time we lived in Medicine Hat so I could start school there, but returned to Hatton the following year. We never had running water so the water pail and dipper on the cupboards were standard fixtures and the outside biffy had its own peculiar order. Needless to say indoor plumbing was also a very intriguing thing for a young boy. In fact it remained intriguing until I graduated from high school and my parents returned to Medicine Hat. But what really &quot;got&quot; me thinking about this was I can&#039;t imagine the shock to my mother&#039;s system when she married my father. She was a &quot;city girl&quot; and rural Alberta and Saskatchewan were far from &quot;city friendly&quot; lol!!! She had to learn how to stoke wood/coal stoves, and later shake down the ashes as well as learning how to cook on them!! She had to learn how to trim lamp wicks, replace mantles and fill the lamps with fuel. She had to endure the &quot;sweet aroma&quot; of the outdoor biffy and learn to use a chamber pot in the winter. She had to haul water by pail for drinking, washing dishes and clothes, bathing and cleaning. Needless to say water was used sparingly as there was one well that served the needs of the entire &quot;hamlet&quot;. Rain water was collected in a cistern and had to be pulled up by pail--it was often used for bathing and washing clothes. That was quite a knack to flip the pail just right so it would fill with water. In the winter, she collected and melted snow for washing clothes and cleaning. I am sure she faced the same anxiety and hardships as the many war-brides faced when they came to Western Canada--all because of love lol. However, like the war-brides, she survived. In fact, in 1969, when my father insisted they return to Medicine Hat, she really didn&#039;t want to leave, but once back to civilization she adapted very quickly lol. (By the way we never did have indoor plumbing, electricity came in 1958 or 1959 and the telephone was on a &quot;party line&quot; and eventually was abandoned.) Can you imagine anyone of us surviving that in this day and age???? But, it was a simpler time, where community counted. We had community dances, bingo, card parties and just good old fashioned visiting!!! What a novel idea of actually talking to someone face to face--not &quot;FaceBooking&quot; or texting lol!!! I apologize for reminiscing, but ironically as I grow older I find myself reflecting on the past--sometimes with fond memories others with regret that I did not handle situations better--but that is life!!! I remember my grandparents doing this and as a child, I loved hearing their stories. Unfortunately, with technology and the internet I am afraid much of this sharing of family history will be lost. With Easter soon upon us, many families will be gathering together so I encourage you to &quot;shelve&quot; the i-phone and share some stories. Everyone may be surprised how much fun that can be.
2015-06-11
THE MAJESTIC COTTONWOOD! Cottonwood, a type of poplar I believe, is indigenous to Medicine Hat and many other cities on the prairies. We have a mammoth one in our yard--the trunk's diameter, I am sure, is in excess of four feet, maybe even five feet and it cascades over our yard at a height of about forty plus feet. For eleven months out of the year we love this tree, we marvel at its strength, its bark and its size. For the most part, she (and a she, she is) is a well behaved tree. It provides shade and shelter and does not send out shoots all over the lawn like most poplars are famous for doing. Even in the fall, when she drops her leaves, she does it relatively quickly giving us ample time to clean up her golden deposits before winter sets its course. The boys and I would often jest that we were raking up gold, but we could only wish lol! Y on the other hand marvels at her, but she does have some issues concerning her behavior! (Perhaps, they are too much alike lol!!) The main issue consumes mainly the month of June How our beloved tree has escaped with her life each year is beyond my grasp of understanding???? She,'the tree' (better clarify which she lol), first of all sends down these "sticky things" that adhere to everything--especially bare or stockinged feet, only to release themselves freely on the hardwood floors, rugs, footstools, etc. The conflict is building! Y. waits and waits to put out her bedding out plants in hopes "the tree" will have shed her cotton! We know it's coming--the question is--WHEN? Each year we look up and access the situation and each year the tree looks like it has hardly any cotton pods so it is safe to plant!!!. "The tree" watches Y's every move-- NO COTTON! Y's pots and flowers look wonderful for about one day--THEN "the tree", in her excitement, releases the cotton. Honestly, it is like a ticker tape parade or a winter blizzard!!! It blankets everything--all Y's flowers, the grass, the lawn furniture, the patios--I mean everything! The cotton adheres to the leaves of the flowers sucking out all their moisture. Y is frantic! She battles back with the hose, but it is almost to no avail!!! I am sure "the tree" is just celebrating Y's victory of getting everything planted, but Y does not see it that way---no-siree!! My buddy, Garth Helle from Poplar Mechanics Tree Cutting, severed a huge branch that over hung the house. It was an endeavor that nobody thought possible--surely it would crash into the house!!! Garth pulled it off without a hitch!!! However, I notice Y has his number out, during the month of June!!!! Will "the tree" survive another year? Of course it will--for three reasons: It is a historical part of Medicine Hat, its good behavior eleven months out of the year is reason enough to be forgiven and it provides such wonderful shade during the hot summers--by the way allowing Y's flowers to blossom incredibly and not be scorched by the hot prairie sun and wind. NOTE: The pictures attached are of our "Beloved Cottonwood" "long may she reign over us!" * Please see my facebook page for photos! Roger
Locations

We provide our families with an open door policy. Please feel free to contact us 24 hours a day.

Saamis Memorial Funeral Chapel, Crematorium & Reception Centre/CGR Holdings Ltd.

1 Dunmore Road SE
Medicine Hat, AB T1A 1Z5
Phone: 403-528-2599 or 1-800-317-2647
Fax: 403-526-9732
Email: inquiry@saamis.com
Testimonials
Brian (Redpath) is a very congenial empathic person. He was such a blessing. Our world needs more people like him.
Mrs. M. M.

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